Greetings from behind a cup of coffee. Not just any coffee. Coconut vanilla flavored coffee with a splash of milk and a bit of foam on top. Indulgent, a bit sweet, and rather pretty in the clear glass cafe mug. It’s sitting on the slate coaster between my monitor and me as I write this. …

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One potential problem with science fiction poetry is that often we readers come to it with the same set of expectations as we would SF stories (I touch on this briefly  in my post “Science Fiction Poetry: Some Starting Questions”). There are plenty examples out there of speculative poems that offer speculative ideas or future-world …

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In the past, I’ve usually managed to read about fifty to sixty books each year, along with numerous short stories, poems, journal issues, and articles. Not a huge number compared to some folks, but respectable, I think, given that I like to give what I read its due attention. This year, it’s looking like I’ll …

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In a recent episode of I Should Be Writing, Mur Lafferty talks about her experiences with audience members approaching her after her reading sessions to challenge her on what they thought was wrong or not working in what she’d just read. Lafferty argues that gender plays a role in this, as the pattern she and …

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Summer in Texas: the heat won’t budge during the day, and it only subsides briefly in the early morning. So, just before the sun comes up, I pop my baby into the stroller for a quick walk around the neighborhood. If, that is, it’s not an ozone action day or the pollution is otherwise low. …

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A recent article in The Guardian sums up concerns about recent female androids in SF films as such: “Maybe that’s the real problem: robot movies are supposedly futuristic, yet most of them peddle antiquated myths and gender stereotypes.” Again and again in film, TV, short stories, novels, games and so on we see these problematic …

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“I’m so sorry,” she said. A classmate in the undergraduate poetry writing course in which we were both enrolled stopped me just after class. “About?” “The poem you wrote. About what happened?” “Oh,” I said. It hadn’t occurred to me that my classmates would think that the events in my workshopped poem, written in first …

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On a clear night in 1986, my dad showed my sisters and me Halley’s Comet, visible only every 76 years. My memory of this is still vivid, not so much of seeing the comet itself, but of the experience of it, standing in the grass beside the clothesline, looking up, away from what is now …

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March is an ideal time to revisit the works of Mary Shelley, Margaret Cavendish, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and the many other women pioneers of science fiction who worked to set the machines of this genre in motion. We shouldn’t limit ourselves to reading these authors’ writings only during Women’s History Month, of course. But we …

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When I reread A Handmaid’s Tale a few years ago, a couple things struck me. First, the scenes that stayed with me the second time I read the book were different from the ones that did so the first time around. When I read the book during grad school, I focused on the political and …

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